The Royal Baby and Drug Policy

So, the Duchess of Cambridge is pregnant. While I worried about the 15% possibility that she might miscarry and suffer the deflation of a nation, Nick Clegg announced that the Succession of the Crown Bill (which would make the first child of William the heir to the throne, rather than the first boy), which requires letters of assent from all 16 Commonwealth Realms, would be put to Parliament next week. Next week! How remarkably quick for an issue that has a 50% chance of even being an issue at all and would not need to be address for at least two years if it were.

So, while Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Canada, Grenada, Jamaica, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, and the UK got their act together for the sake of the soon-to-be third in line to the monarchy, here’s some of the drug laws they have in place:

Country Notes
Saint Kitts and Nevis A Brick Kiln man will have to come up with $15,000 for various drug charges or serve time in Her Majesty’s Prison.Additional Magistrate Janine Harris handed down the stiff fine on Aldre Maynard on Tuesday (July 17) when he appeared before the court and pleaded guilty to three marijuana charges.Maynard was charged with possession of cannabis, cultivation of cannabis, and possession with intent to supply cannabis.”
 Australia “See also: Cannabis in Australia

Decriminalized for personal use in small amounts in the Australian Capital Territory, South Australia, Western Australia and the Northern Territory. It is a criminal offence in New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria and Tasmania. Enforcement varies from state to state,[4] though a criminal conviction for possession of a small amount is unlikely and diversion programs in these states aim to divert offenders into education, assessment and treatment programs.[5] With the rapid expansion in hydroponically grown cannabis cultivation, the Australian Drug Misuse and Trafficking Act (1985) was amended in 2006, reducing the amount of cannabis grown indoors under hydroponic conditions that qualifies as a ‘commercial quantity’ or as a ‘large quantity’[5]

Bermuda “The maximum penalty for drug dealing is ten years in jail and/or a $500,000 fine.”
Canada “see Legislation: “Controlled Drugs and Substances Act” [14]
 Jamaica “Cultivation, retail and consumption is illegal. However this is often overlooked and cannabis is sold openly.[50]
 New Zealand “Cultivation, possession or sale of cannabis is illegal.[65] The fruit, seeds, and any other part of the plant are scheduled as Class C substances.Hashish, hash oil, THC, and any other preparations containing THC made by processing the plant are scheduled as Class B substances. In July 2009, a bill promoted by Green Party co-leader Metiria Turei amending the law to permit the use of medicinal cannabis was defeated 84-34 at its first reading, with all members of the ruling National Party voting against it[66].[68][69]
Belize “On July 16, the government of Belize released a press statement announcing the appointment of a committee to evaluate a proposal to decriminalize marijuana possession. The committee – to be headed by a former police minister – was appointed by the Minister of National Security. The proposal in question seeks to remove criminal sanctions for possession of up to 10 grams of marijuana and instead impose fines and mandatory drug education. Currently, possession of less than 60 grams of marijuana is punishable by a fine of up to US$26,000 and/or up to three years in prison.”
 United Kingdom “Cannabis is a Class B drug (moderate risk) in the UK. Possession of less than 3 grams however, is likely to result in mere confiscation and a written warning.”
Solomon Islands “Drug use is illegal in Solomon Islands, and can lead to prison sentences. Swearing is a crime and can lead to large compensation claims and even jail.”
Grenada “Law enforcement agencies in Grenada cooperate well on drug control. They meet regularly to plan joint operations, thereby maximizing available assets. The government opened its National Coordination Center for law enforcement in 2001. Through August 2003, Grenadian authorities reported seizing approximately 40 kilograms of cocaine and 155 kilograms of marijuana. During that period, they arrested 456 persons (21 non-nationals) on drug-related charges and eradicated 3,434 marijuana plants. Grenadian law enforcement authorities seized nearly ECD 300,000 ($115,000) in connection with drug-related cases. The police drug squad has collaborated closely with DEA officials in the targeting and investigation of a local cocaine trafficking organization, which has associations with South American and other Caribbean traffickers.”

So, if it’s going to take a week for the entire constitutional fabric of sixteen states to be rewritten, how long do you think it would take for decriminalise drugs if any politician really wanted to? How many people would that benefit?

Something to think about.

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